3 signs that you have Post Trumatic Stress Disorder PTSD

December 4, 2015

 

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that can occur following the experience of or witnessing of a traumatic event.  A traumatic event is a life-threatening event such as military combat, natural disasters, terrorist incidents, serious accidents, or physical or sexual assault in adult or childhood.  Most survivors of trauma return to normal given a little time.  However, some people will have stress reactions that do not go away on their own, or may even get worse over time.  These individuals may develop PTSD.  

About 60% of men and 50% of women experience a traumatic event in their lifetime.  Most people who are exposed to a traumatic event will have some of the symptoms of PTSD in the days and weeks after the event.  For some people these symptoms are more severe and long lasting.  The reasons why some people develop PTSD are still being studied.  There are biological, psychological and social factors that affect the development of PTSD

Although PTSD symptoms can begin right after a traumatic event, PTSD is not diagnosed unless the symptoms last for at least one month, and either cause significant distress or interfere with work or home life. In order to be diagnosed with PTSD, a person must have three different types of symptoms

 

Re-experiencing Symptoms:  

Re-experiencing symptoms are symptoms that involve reliving the traumatic event. There are a number of ways in which people may relive a trauma.  They may have upsetting memories of the traumatic event. These memories can come back when they are not expecting them.  At other times the memories may be triggered by a traumatic reminder such as when a combat veteran hears a car backfire, a motor vehicle accident victim drives by a car accident or a rape victim sees a news report of a recent sexual assault. These memories can cause both emotional and physical reactions. Sometimes these memories can feel so real it is as if the event is actually happening again. This is called a "flashback." Reliving the event may cause intense feelings of fear, helplessness, and horror similar to the feelings they had when the event took place.  

 

Avoidance and Numbing Symptoms

Avoidance symptoms are efforts people make to avoid the traumatic event. Individuals with PTSD may try to avoid situations that trigger memories of the traumatic event. They may avoid going near places where the trauma occurred or seeing TV programs or news reports about similar events. They may avoid other sights, sounds, smells, or people that are reminders of the traumatic event.  Some people find that they try and distract themselves as one way to avoid thinking about the traumatic event. 

Numbing symptoms are another way to avoid the traumatic event.  Individuals with PTSD may find it difficult to be in touch with their feelings or express emotions toward other people. For example, they may feel emotionally "numb" and may isolate from others.  They may be less interested in activities you once enjoyed.  Some people forget, or are unable to talk about, important parts of the event.  Some think that they will have a shortened life span or will not reach personal goals such as having a career or family. 

 

Arousal Symptoms: 

People with PTSD may feel constantly alert after the traumatic event. This is known as increased emotional arousal, and it can cause difficulty sleeping, outbursts of anger or irritability, and difficulty concentrating.  They may find that they are constantly “on guard” and on the lookout for signs of danger.  They may also find that they get startled. 

 

In addition to the symptoms described above, we now know that there are clear biological changes in brain chemistry that are associated with PTSD.  PTSD is complicated by the fact that people with PTSD often develop additional disorders such as depression, substance abuse, problems of memory and cognition, and other problems of physical and mental health. These problems may lead to impairment of the person’s ability to function in social or family life, including occupational instability, marital problems and family problems.  

PTSD can be treated with psychotherapy (“talk” therapy) and medicines such as antidepressants. Early treatment is important and may help reduce long-term symptoms. Unfortunately, many people do not know that they have PTSD or do not seek treatment. 

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